DesignShare Logo

Search

Our Current Featured Education Group: Launching in Brussels in April! More Here
Directory Case Studies Articles Awards Program Language of School Design
Membership E-Newsletter Blog Events About Contact Home
image Blog Category: General

Are iPads Creating a New Instructional Ecosystem?

December 22nd, 2011


An article by Joanne and Kit Hard

Premise: The iPad’s combination of simplicity and versatility gives teachers the ability to meet the diverse learning needs of students and distinguishes the iPad as a disruptive force within education.

Click here to read and add to the comments if you agree or disagree.

Education Nation?

October 7th, 2010

education_nation

Education Nation: Six Leading Edges of Innovation in our Schools (Jossey-Bass)
by Milton Chen

Review by Randy Fielding

Milton Chen poses this challenge in his recently published book, Education Nation:
“Imagine an Education Nation, a learning society where the education of children and adults is the highest national priority, on par with a strong economy, high employment, and national security.”

Chen proceeds to help us imagine this scenario with examples from his own experience. His intent for the book is to curate the collection of Edutopia.org, with its wide range of films, articles and other materials about education. He frames these resources within six “edges” of innovative definitions of learning.

Two of these edges are the “Curriculum Edge: Real Learning and Authentic Assessment,” and The Technology Edge: Putting Modern Tools in Young Hands.” In my experience, these edges have proven to be powerful drivers in successful schools around the world. An example is Hip-Hop High in St. Paul Minnesota (also know as High School for Recording Arts). Forty percent of the students are homeless; many have been in the criminal justice system, expelled from other schools, and have children of their own. Despite such difficult challenges, these students are authentically engaged at Hip-Hop High—connected through a sense of community, music, and the opportunity to master emerging technologies. (http://www.designshare.com/index.php/projects/hip-hop-high/narratives )

Using stories gleaned from his many years of work in public television, the Sesame Workshop, and as executive director of The George Lucas Educational Foundation, Chen arranges a wide variety of complex ideas into accessible categories, making the volume an organized repository of innovative educational components. The message of the book is the need for these “edges” to move toward the center of American society’s focus. In his view, quality education is actually the key to a strong economy, high employment and national security, positioning it as the highest priority in this country today. Yet, the truth is that many of these creative concepts remain on the edge or are non-existent in American public education.

A national dialogue about the priority of education recently occurred, and Chen’s book title and input played a role. NBC’s Education Nation Summit was held, along with a preview showing of Waiting for Superman, a documentary on the state of public schools, which officially premiered October 8th. The film is by David Guggenheim, the award-winning director of An Inconvenient Truth, and it follows a cast of school children as they struggle for a chance at what used to be a given in the United States – an excellent public education. Heart-breaking stories and facts combine to create a potent indictment of the current state of public schools.
 With a less emotional viewpoint, Chen’s Education Nation provides solutions to these complex issues, and will serve as a useful reference indeed for administrators, teachers and indeed anyone concerned with the state of the American public school system.

What approach will be the most effective in producing change? We’re interested in your views, so please comment below.

Randall Fielding, AIA, is the founder of DesignShare, and also the Chairman of Fielding Nair International, Architects and Change Agents for Creative Learning Communities. He can be reached at: randy@fieldingnair.com

CEFPI and Schools for Children of the World Partner in Haiti Relief Effort

January 20th, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 20, 2010
CONTACT: Barbara C. Worth
480.285.9002
barb@cefpi.org

CEFPI and Schools for Children of the World Partner in Haiti Relief Effort

Washington, DC - In response to the overwhelming challenges facing the people of Haiti following the catastrophic earthquake of January 12, the Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is partnering together with Schools for the Children of the World (SCW), a non-profit organization dedicated to building schools in emerging and developing countries, to establish a relief effort.

The first priority is to seek volunteers, particularly structural engineers with seismic expertise, to participate on a task force to assess the safety of the damaged school facilities and to assist with the immediate clean-up efforts. This task force will also formulate strategies on how the organizations can best help in the recovery process, as the need will be monumental in rebuilding the damaged and destroyed schools. Several assessment trips will be planned during the next two months. Each volunteer can expect to pay $1,500-2,000 to participate. Visit www.cefpi.org to participate or contribute to this effort.

Schools that can be repaired will need project managers to manage project funds and provide project oversight as well as architects and engineers to provide design solutions and contractors to make the needed repairs. Facilities that are beyond repair will need project managers, contractors to assist with the demolition and cleanup and educational facility planners, architects and engineers with seismic experience to plan and design replacement facilities. Fundraisers to identify and secure resources will be of great import in the recovery process.

The Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is the only professional organization whose principal purpose is improving the places where children learn. CEFPI embraces a diverse group of professionals with one single goal – building healthy, safe, high performance and sustainable learning environments that enhance student and teacher performance and support culture and community vitality.

###

School Design Futures

December 17th, 2009

Design Futures

Creating spaces for learning or making room for education?

December 10th, 2009

Gert Biesta
Creating spaces for learning or making room for education?

May 27th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus at ***2.00pm

Recent discussions about education have seen a remarkable rise in the use of spatial language, particularly around the idea of the creation of environments for learning. This is mainly the result of a shift in emphasis in educational thinking from the activities of the teacher to the activities of the student, changing the role from the teacher to that of a facilitator of learning processes. Although a lot can be said in support of this shift, there are also some problematic consequences that primarily have to do with a decline in attention to questions about educational purpose. It is, after all, one thing to create environments that support learning, but it is another thing to create environments that support a particular kind of learning. In this presentation I focus on the latter question in order to explore how different views about the aims and ends of education generate different requirements for the creation of the spaces and places in and through which education happens. In this regard I am particularly interested in the connections between education, space and democracy. Rather than a focus on creating spaces for learning in a general sense, I will argue that the key question for school architecture is how to make room for education.

Gert Biesta is Professor of Education and Director of Postgraduate Research at the Stirling Institute of Education, the University of Stirling, where he also co-directs the Laboratory for Educational Theory. He is editor-in-chief of Studies in Philosophy and Education and author of many books on the theory and philosophy of education. Recent titles include: Beyond Learning: Democracy Education for a Human Future (Paradigm Publishers 2006); Education, Democracy and the Moral Life (Michael Katz, Susan Verducci and Gert Biesta eds., Springer 2009); and Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching (Richard Edwards, Gert Biesta and Mary Thorpe eds., Routledge 2009).

Transforming teaching and learning through architecture and design: what is possible or desirable?

December 10th, 2009

Pamela Woolner
Transforming teaching and learning through architecture and design: what is possible or desirable?

May 26th

The current wave of school building, especially Building Schools for the Future (BSF), aspires to be transformational: changing physical settings but also educational aims, methods and outcomes. My talk will examine the relationship between school premises and educational practices, considering research evidence from various disciplines and past experience of school building programmes. When can physical change support, enable or even cause change? What are the limitations?

Pam holds a first degree in psychology, taught maths in schools and is now a Research Associate in the Research Centre for Learning and Teaching (RCfLaT), School of Education, Newcastle University. Through carrying out reviews and evaluations commissioned by the Design Council, CFBT and the Arts Council, she has developed her understanding of the evidence base and historical background relating to the effect of environment on education, as well as the actual experience of attempting change. Currently she is an Advisory Group member for an EPSRC funded project, ‘Designing New Schools - putting people at the heart of the process’, based at the School of Architecture, University of Sheffield, and a Steering Group member for a HEFCE investigation of academic workplaces based at the Department of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University. She is also working on a book to support educators and others in schools to engage with architects to develop their school environments through rebuilding or refurbishment.

Education, sustainability and the built environment - the ecology of the classroom

December 10th, 2009

Linda Farrow
Education, sustainability and the built environment - the ecology of the classroom

May 20th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

Knowing how to live within our environmental means is an increasingly core life-skill. To what extent can the design of educational buildings and landscape help equip people with the knowledge, skills and experiences to do this? I will explore this question using examples from our practice portfolio. Linda Farrow is Director of White Design, Bristol.

Critiquing the Idea of a Sustainable School as a model and catalyst for change

December 10th, 2009

Professor William Scott
Critiquing the Idea of a Sustainable School as a model and catalyst for change

May 18th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

The government has a hugely ambitious goal that every school will be a ’sustainable school’ by 2020, and it encourages institutions to address sustainability across all aspects of school life: [i] what (and how) students are taught; [ii] how the school campus is managed, and the school is led; and [iii] how the school can act as a model and catalyst for change within the wider community. In 2004, Prime Minister Tony Blair said:

“Sustainable development will not just be a subject in the classroom: it will be in its bricks and mortar and the way the school uses and even generates its own power. Our students won’t just be told about sustainable development, they will see and work within it: a living, learning place in which to explore what a sustainable lifestyle means.” Drawing on recent research, the lecture will critically examine the idea of the ’sustainable school’, and raise questions about the role of the school in modeling and catalyzing change within the community.

William Scott is a Professor of Education at the University of Bath where he is head of its Education and Sustainability research programme, director of the Centre for Research in Education and the Environment, and a deputy-director of the University’s Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment. He was founding editor of the journal Environmental Education Research, is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and chair of the community interest company South West Learning for Sustainability Coalition. William Scott’s research focuses on the role of learning in sustainable development, on the contributions that educational institutions can make to this, and on the problems of researching the effectiveness of such activities. Of particular interest are: conceptual issues to do with the nature of education and professional development; pedagogical and evaluative issues about processes of learning and teaching; and, ethical questions about the focus and limits of such interventions. These issues are addressed through research, consultancy, development and evaluation studies, through teaching, and through writing and reviewing, and William Scott has worked closely with research councils, government, industry, NGOs, and other agencies in the UK and in other countries.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1/media.m4v

Leading Practice in creating learning spaces in Victoria

December 10th, 2009

Dr Elizabeth Hartnell-Young and Ms Lynne Sutton
Leading Practice in creating learning spaces in Victoria

May 13th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, 5pm (Video presentation)

In 2009 the Australian Government’s stimulus package in response to the Global Financial Crisis includes ‘Building the Education Revolution’. This involves building new science or language learning centres in disadvantaged secondary schools across Australia. Eligible schools need to have a demonstrated need, readiness and capacity to complete the facilities before 30 June 2010. Victoria has produced a range of interesting designs based on the evidence from its Leading School Fund work, where, over recent years, whole-school change has been supported by development and renewal of facilities. Lynne and Elizabeth will show the designs, discuss how they have been informed by recent evidence and current needs, and identify challenges for designers and educators.

Dr Elizabeth Hartnell-Young is Group Manager Research in the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Victoria, Australia and also an honorary fellow at The University of Melbourne. Ms Lynne Sutton is Senior Project Manager, Building the Education Revolution project at the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Victoria.

Researching the relationship between sustainable design in education buildings and institutional change for sustainability.

December 10th, 2009

Glenn Strachan
Researching the relationship between sustainable design in education buildings and institutional change for sustainability.

May 11th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

Increasing numbers of education buildings are labelled as being sustainable and deliver environmental management benefits. However, consideration is not always given to how elements of sustainable design can be used as a catalyst for whole institutional change. This seminar will explore a research method for investigating the relationship between sustainable building design and institutional change for sustainability in the education sector.
Glenn taught in schools and colleges until 1998 when he left the formal education sector to become Head of Education at Earth Centre, a flagship Millennium Project in Yorkshire based on demonstrating and promoting sustainable development. From 2002 to 2008 he combined consultancy work on a wide range of sustainable development projects with work on the London South Bank University, Education for Sustainability Master’s Programme. He joined the International Research Institute in Sustainability at the University of Gloucestershire in June 2008 where he leads a research strand on professional practice and sustainability. He is also pursuing his own research interests in the sustainable design of education buildings with a view to completing a PhD.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9/media.m4v

Learning through Architecture - Engagement, design and construction as a learning tool

December 10th, 2009

Prue Chiles
Learning through Architecture - Engagement, design and construction as a learning tool

May 6th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

The talk will look at how schools and playgrounds can inspire children and staff about issues of environment, about healthy living, about interactive learning. and about how the process of design and construction is fundamental to creating a good learning environment. This will be illustrated by our own built projects and others we have found inspiring and supported by our research.

Prue Chiles is Director of Architecture at the School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield and continues to practice as architect and Director of the Bureau of Design and Research, Sheffield.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4/media.m4v

Listening to Children: developing the sustainable school

December 10th, 2009

Elizabeth Barratt Hacking
Listening to Children: developing the sustainable school

April 29th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, ***2.00pm

A range of resources, advice and tools have been provided to support schools in planning their ‘journey to sustainability’ in consideration of the campus, curriculum and community dimensions of the sustainable schools initiative. However, this advice tends to focus on the role of adults involved in leading this initiative, with little attention paid to the potential role of children. Drawing on participatory research with children and adults in schools I will explore the benefits of listening to children and engaging children’s participation in developing the sustainable school.

Elisabeth is an academic from the Centre for Research in Education and the Environment, University of Bath, UK. Elisabeth lectures in geographical and environmental education and learning at postgraduate level. Her research focuses on how environmental experience influences children’s wellbeing; this is undertaken in school settings using participatory research approaches with children and teachers. She was co-director of the ESRC (UK Research Council) project ‘Listening to Children: Environmental Perspectives and the School Curriculum’ and is currently co-ordinating a research project for the national ‘Growing Schools’ programme in England. Recently, Elisabeth co-edited ‘Childhood and Environment’, a special issue of the journal Environmental Education Research. Elisabeth was Honorary Editor of the journal Teaching Geography for almost 10 years.

Basics of Good School Design

December 10th, 2009

Alan Dale
Basics of Good School Design

April 27th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5 pm

Alan Dale is an experience schools architects working both for local authority and in private practice. He has recently been working as a design advisor for Building Schools for the Future programmes in the North West, South London and Islington and is preparing a book on school design which summarizes his many years of experience.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99/media.m4v

At the heart of the (sustainable) community…

December 10th, 2009

Robin Nicholson
CBE RIBA Hon FIStructE

At the heart of the (sustainable) community…
April 22nd, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5 pm

My journey will bring together some thoughts arising from the education work of our practice, the urban regeneration business under New Labour, CABE’s work on school design and sustainable development and the work of the Zero Carbon Schools Task Force. I will explore some of the gaps between what is and what must be if we are to have a chance of mitigating the effects of climate change and our need for design excellence.

Robin Nicholson is a senior member of Edward Cullinan Architects, which he joined in 1979. Previously he had worked for James Stirling and taught at the Bartlett and North London. He was a Vice-President of the RIBA (1992-94), Chairman of the Construction Industry Council (1998-2000) and founder member of the Movement for Innovation Board (1998-2001). He sat on the DETR Urban Sounding Board (2001-03). Currently he is Joint Deputy Chair of CABE, where he leads on Climate Change and Sustainable Development. He is a Board Member of the NHBC and chairs NHBC Services Ltd. He is chairman of the DCSF Zero Carbon Task Force. He helped develop the Design Quality Indicator and sits on the DQI Development Group. He is Convenor of the Construction Industry think-tank, The Edge Debates (1996-), and was awarded a CBE for Services to Architecture in 1999 and an Honorary Fellowship of the Institution of Structural Engineers in 2002.

Please see the links below to the audio recording of the lecture (University login required):

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/65b53d42-7f33-420f-8095-9b2b55391581/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/65b53d42-7f33-420f-8095-9b2b55391581/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/65b53d42-7f33-420f-8095-9b2b55391581/media.m4v

Education Design and Crowd Control

December 10th, 2009

Mark Dudek
Education Design and Crowd Control

20th April, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

From Tom Brown’s School Days, by way of Lindsay Anderson’s If, through to The Wire and Laurent Cantet’s The Class, school environments are and always have been the context for high drama. As designers, should we therefore be more interested in the people using the spaces rather than making grand architectural statements about how buildings can transform people’s lives? By way of an introduction to the series, Mark Dudek asks the question, why are the environments within which education and learning takes place, of such high cultural value, yet at the same time perceived to be so little significance by the teaching profession?

Mark Dudek is an architect and school design consultant, Director of Mark Dudek Associates a specialist architectural design consultancy concentrating on education and childcare. He is author of many authoritative books on school design, including Schools and Kindergartens: A Design Manual, Building for Young Children, Children’s Spaces, Architecture of Schools: The New Learning Environments and Kindergarten Architecture.

Connecting innovative design with innovative ways of learning

October 26th, 2009

Please share your ideas and experiences with truly innovative educational facilities. We invite you to write about the most innovative schools you’ve worked for, attended or visited. Describe how those facilities intertwined phenomenal curricular activity with outstanding buildings, and your schools could become DesignShare case studies!

NEW CEFPI LEADERSHIP ASSUMES OFFICE

October 23rd, 2009

SCOTTSDALE, AZ (October 23, 2009)— New officers for 2009-2010 were introduced during the closing plenary of the recent Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) World Conference & Expo in Washington, DC.

Judith P. Hoskens assumed the helm of the organization as president of the CEFPI Board of Directors. Judy Hoskens’ past contributions have been exceptional in furthering the vision of the Council – to promote excellence in student learning environments. Judy’s dedication to the development of effective educational facilities utilizing a successful planning process with attention to the community, the educational specifications and the environment is unparalleled.

As senior educational planner and project manager in Cuningham Group Architecture’s Minneapolis office, Judy Hoskens has first-hand experience translating client goals and needs into unique building solutions. Through her participation on many projects, she has reaffirmed her belief that the best educational facilities result from the active participation of all stakeholders, including learners, educators, administrators, parents and community members.

Daniel R. Mader, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, takes over the position of Midwest Great/Lakes representative on the Board of Directors. As president and CEO of Fanning Howey, a leading architectural engineering firm specializing in educational facility design, Dan Mader has over 30 years of experience in educational facility planning and design. Dan has been an active member of CEFPI for 17 years and has served as the Midwest – Great Lakes region president, past president and treasurer as well as governor for Area 5. He has been a part of the International strategic planning team, a member of the panel for the selection of CEFPI Planner of the Year, and has served on the nominating committee for international president.

An active member of CEFPI since 1974, Edward M. McMilin, REFP, at-large representative, Board of Directors, has held a number of leadership positions, including president of the Midwest/Great Lakes region for six different terms. He is currently serving on the International Governance task force that is part of the effort to create and implement a new strategic plan enabling CEFPI to assume a greater global position. During his 32 year tenure as facilities planner for Milwaukee Public Schools, Ed McMilin was involved in all phases of the planning, design, and construction of hundreds of projects involving new schools, additions, and renovations of existing facilities totaling over $500 million. He oversaw the implementation of the $120 million Neighborhood Schools Initiative that created 11,000 new student seats in six new schools, 19 additions to schools, and renovations in 14 other schools in order to reduce an equal number of students being transported, thus permitting these students to attend school in their neighborhood. Ed also accomplished several community projects that were part of the economic development in the City of Milwaukee.

The Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is the only professional organization whose principal purpose is improving the places where children learn. CEFPI embraces a diverse group of professionals with one single goal – building healthy, safe, high performance and sustainable learning environments that enhance student and teacher performance and support culture and community vitality. To learn more, visit www.cefpi.org

# # #

School Building Expo - CALL FOR PAPERS

October 22nd, 2009

CALL FOR PAPERS
2010 School Building Expo
2010 College Building Expo
MAY 10-13, 2010 – NAVY PIER, CHICAGO, IL

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: November 18th, 2010
TO SUBMIT: http://www.schoolbuildingexpo.com/tospeak.asp
http://www.collegebuildingexpo.com/tospeak.asp

TWO Conferences under one roof!! In 2010 School Building Expo will be held in conjunction with College Building Expo at the Navy Pier in Chicago, May 10-13th. These two events will offer over 25 concurrent sessions that highlight the top professionals that are shaping the future of education design, build and construction. The sessions should focus on furthering the knowledge of professionals associated with education and educational facilities.

If you are in K-12 and want to share your expertise and experiences with our industry please visit http://www.schoolbuildingexpo.com/tospeak.asp and if you are in higher education and want to share please visit http://www.collegebuildingexpo.com/tospeak.asp .

I would be happy to discuss your ideas further or answer any questions. Please feel free to contact me directly at jenabeth@jdevents.com or 508-759-0075.

ROSA PARKS SCHOOL NAMED 2009 MACCONNELL AWARD WINNER

October 19th, 2009

SCOTTSDALE, AZ (October 19, 2009) – Rosa Parks School and the Community Campus at New Columbia, Portland, Oregon, received the highly regarded 2009 James D. MacConnell Award for school facility planning excellence during the Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) recent World Conference & Expo in Washington, DC. The internationally recognized award was created by CEFPI to acknowledge the significant contributions that Dr. MacConnell made to both the profession of planning educational facilities and to CEFPI. The MacConnell Award is presented to the most exemplary project that demonstrates a comprehensive planning process, development of wide-ranging educational specifications, and a design that meets the requirement of the educational program.

The Rosa Parks School and the Community Campus at New Columbia began as a community conversation concerning Columbia Villa, a low income housing project that had fallen into economic and social disrepair and resulted in a collaborative vision to rebuild Columbia Villa as a mixed-use, mixed-income neighborhood called New Columbia, anchored by the Community Campus. The centerpiece of the Community Campus is the new Rosa Parks School, the second new school to be designed and constructed by Portland Public Schools in 30 years.

The firm of Dull Olson Weekes Architects led the district in a consensus-based design process which involved city leaders, Columbia Villa residents, adjacent neighbors, Housing Authority commissioners, local businesses, staff and parents. Meeting at the Community Campus, a Campus Compact was drawn that integrated the public-private partnership creating a framework for operations, funding, rights and obligations, as well as an on-site committee to deal with future initiatives and issues. The partners include the Housing Authority of Portland (HAP), Portland Public Schools, Boys and Girls Club and Portland Parks & Recreation.

Without the combination of private, public and federal funds, Rosa Parks School and the Community Campus might still remain a dream. Over 25 private donors and foundations provided support and in-kind services for this truly intergenerational center. Federal tax credits provided supplemental funding and the state of Oregon provided monies to procure furniture. Even more importantly, by partnering, sharing space, and aligning programs, the overall cost of the project was reduced almost by half.

The school is Portland Public School’s first “green” development and has been certified LEED Gold. Environmentally focused, Rosa Parks’ developable property is less than 1.8 acres and nearly 90% of the students walk or bike to school. The school is divided into four educational neighborhoods, each serving 125-130 students. Internal programs are augmented by support from local businesses that provide mentorship, and family participation is encouraged.

“Rosa Parks School and Community Campus is to be congratulated for its intensive collaboration and community planning that resulted in an exemplary model for building future community partnerships, outstanding learning environments and strong neighborhoods in the Portland Public Schools district. It truly is a sustainable learning laboratory, including photovoltaics, 100 % stormwater retention and a community garden,” stated Judy Hoskens, REFP, president, CEFPI.

The construction of the Rosa Parks School and Community Campus was instrumental in initiating a city-wide conversation regarding all Portland Public School facilities, the roles of school in the community and the community in the school. In a city noted worldwide for its exemplary planning, schools seem to have been forgotten. The conversation concluded with the development of a set of Guiding Principles on which the district will base future school decisions. These principles include: schools as center of community and neighborhood; community and the development of partnerships; creative teaching and learning; sustainability- think green/teach green; and, adaptability to continuous change.

The Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is the only professional organization whose principal purpose is improving the places where children learn. CEFPI embraces a diverse group of professionals with one single goal – building healthy, safe, high performance and sustainable learning environments that enhance student and teacher performance and support culture and community vitality. To learn more, visit www.cefpi.org

# # #

Irene Nigaglioni, AIA, REFP, awarded 2009 Planner of the Year

October 15th, 2009

SCOTTSDALE, AZ (October 14, 2009)—Irene Nigaglioni, AIA, REFP, is the recipient of the 2009 Planner of the Year award, the highest and most distinguished individual honor conferred by the Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI).

The Planner of the Year award is presented annually to the individual whose professional facility planning activities have produced a positive and significant regional, national and/or international impact on educational facility planning, adding to the body of knowledge and store of best practices in the field. This year’s exceptional winner qualifies on every level, signified by her passion for planning quality facilities for all students served by her constituents.

Ms. Nigaglioni was instrumental in the establishment of the “School Construction Cost Outlook”, an annual collaborative publication between members of the CEFPI Gulf Coast Chapter and the Houston chapter of the Associated General Contractors (AGC). The annual publication provides recommendations which assist school districts in planning bond referendums and scheduling future construction.

In response to the devastating hurricanes of 2005, Irene Nigaglioni was first to volunteer and co-chair the Katrina/Rita Task Force, a CEFPI Southern region effort to turn adversity into a positive outcome. She headed the effort, eventually enlisting the support of the CEFPI Foundation & Charitable Trust’s Paragon Project program to assist her in providing support and expertise to affected school districts. Motivated by this experience, Ms. Nigaglioni led the charge in developing a Disaster Recovery Guide, available to school districts worldwide in an effort to assist them to prepare, manage and recover from a disaster. This dynamic Guide resides on the CEFPI website and Ms. Nigaglioni continues to update the information.

“Ms. Nigaglioni brought a dimension to CEFPI’s role in educational facility planning which extends beyond its belief statement: there is a standard by which to measure. She used her professional skills in a true humanitarian effort for our children and should be held up as representative of the true mission and vision of CEFPI,” stated Beverly C. Lawrason, assistant superintendent, St. Bernard Parish, LA.

“Dedicated, energetic, enthusiastic and knowledgeable, coupled with her ‘let’s get-it-done’ attitude, are words that come to mind when describing this unique and remarkable woman, Irene Nigaglioni,” said William A. Stice, REFP, president, CEFPI Southern region.

Most recently, Ms. Nigaglioni served as international chairperson for the CEFPI Communications Committee, delivering the “101 Handbook”; website upgrades and teasers; video conferencing and podcasts; as well as an online library and bulletin board. A graduate of the CEFPI/San Diego State University Advanced Certification program, Ms. Nigaglioni serves as a professor for one of the eight-week courses.

“Nominated by her colleagues for this prestigious award, Irene Nigaglioni’s compassion and commitment to provide quality learning environments for all learners is unparalled,” remarked Judith P. Hoskens, REFP, president, CEFPI.

The Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) is the only professional organization whose principal purpose is improving the places where children learn. CEFPI embraces a diverse group of professionals with one single goal – building healthy, safe, high performance and sustainable learning environments that enhance student and teacher performance and support culture and community vitality. To learn more, visit www.cefpi.org

.# # #


Membership | Reprint Policies | About | Contact | Home
© DesignShare.com 1998-2014. All rights reserved.