DesignShare Logo

Search

Our Current Featured Education Group:
Directory Case Studies Articles Awards Program Language of School Design
Membership E-Newsletter Events About Contact Home
 
Archive for December, 2009
School Design Futures December 17th, 2009

Design Futures

Creating spaces for learning or making room for education? December 10th, 2009

Gert Biesta
Creating spaces for learning or making room for education?

May 27th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus at ***2.00pm

Recent discussions about education have seen a remarkable rise in the use of spatial language, particularly around the idea of the creation of environments for learning. This is mainly the result of a shift in emphasis in educational thinking from the activities of the teacher to the activities of the student, changing the role from the teacher to that of a facilitator of learning processes. Although a lot can be said in support of this shift, there are also some problematic consequences that primarily have to do with a decline in attention to questions about educational purpose. It is, after all, one thing to create environments that support learning, but it is another thing to create environments that support a particular kind of learning. In this presentation I focus on the latter question in order to explore how different views about the aims and ends of education generate different requirements for the creation of the spaces and places in and through which education happens. In this regard I am particularly interested in the connections between education, space and democracy. Rather than a focus on creating spaces for learning in a general sense, I will argue that the key question for school architecture is how to make room for education.

Gert Biesta is Professor of Education and Director of Postgraduate Research at the Stirling Institute of Education, the University of Stirling, where he also co-directs the Laboratory for Educational Theory. He is editor-in-chief of Studies in Philosophy and Education and author of many books on the theory and philosophy of education. Recent titles include: Beyond Learning: Democracy Education for a Human Future (Paradigm Publishers 2006); Education, Democracy and the Moral Life (Michael Katz, Susan Verducci and Gert Biesta eds., Springer 2009); and Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching (Richard Edwards, Gert Biesta and Mary Thorpe eds., Routledge 2009).

Transforming teaching and learning through architecture and design: what is possible or desirable? December 10th, 2009

Pamela Woolner
Transforming teaching and learning through architecture and design: what is possible or desirable?

May 26th

The current wave of school building, especially Building Schools for the Future (BSF), aspires to be transformational: changing physical settings but also educational aims, methods and outcomes. My talk will examine the relationship between school premises and educational practices, considering research evidence from various disciplines and past experience of school building programmes. When can physical change support, enable or even cause change? What are the limitations?

Pam holds a first degree in psychology, taught maths in schools and is now a Research Associate in the Research Centre for Learning and Teaching (RCfLaT), School of Education, Newcastle University. Through carrying out reviews and evaluations commissioned by the Design Council, CFBT and the Arts Council, she has developed her understanding of the evidence base and historical background relating to the effect of environment on education, as well as the actual experience of attempting change. Currently she is an Advisory Group member for an EPSRC funded project, ‘Designing New Schools – putting people at the heart of the process’, based at the School of Architecture, University of Sheffield, and a Steering Group member for a HEFCE investigation of academic workplaces based at the Department of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University. She is also working on a book to support educators and others in schools to engage with architects to develop their school environments through rebuilding or refurbishment.

Education, sustainability and the built environment – the ecology of the classroom December 10th, 2009

Linda Farrow
Education, sustainability and the built environment – the ecology of the classroom

May 20th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

Knowing how to live within our environmental means is an increasingly core life-skill. To what extent can the design of educational buildings and landscape help equip people with the knowledge, skills and experiences to do this? I will explore this question using examples from our practice portfolio. Linda Farrow is Director of White Design, Bristol.

Critiquing the Idea of a Sustainable School as a model and catalyst for change December 10th, 2009

Professor William Scott
Critiquing the Idea of a Sustainable School as a model and catalyst for change

May 18th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

The government has a hugely ambitious goal that every school will be a ‘sustainable school’ by 2020, and it encourages institutions to address sustainability across all aspects of school life: [i] what (and how) students are taught; [ii] how the school campus is managed, and the school is led; and [iii] how the school can act as a model and catalyst for change within the wider community. In 2004, Prime Minister Tony Blair said:

“Sustainable development will not just be a subject in the classroom: it will be in its bricks and mortar and the way the school uses and even generates its own power. Our students won’t just be told about sustainable development, they will see and work within it: a living, learning place in which to explore what a sustainable lifestyle means.” Drawing on recent research, the lecture will critically examine the idea of the ‘sustainable school’, and raise questions about the role of the school in modeling and catalyzing change within the community.

William Scott is a Professor of Education at the University of Bath where he is head of its Education and Sustainability research programme, director of the Centre for Research in Education and the Environment, and a deputy-director of the University’s Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment. He was founding editor of the journal Environmental Education Research, is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and chair of the community interest company South West Learning for Sustainability Coalition. William Scott’s research focuses on the role of learning in sustainable development, on the contributions that educational institutions can make to this, and on the problems of researching the effectiveness of such activities. Of particular interest are: conceptual issues to do with the nature of education and professional development; pedagogical and evaluative issues about processes of learning and teaching; and, ethical questions about the focus and limits of such interventions. These issues are addressed through research, consultancy, development and evaluation studies, through teaching, and through writing and reviewing, and William Scott has worked closely with research councils, government, industry, NGOs, and other agencies in the UK and in other countries.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/acf00f08-3e6f-4847-9e0e-3bc49aaf95f1/media.m4v

Leading Practice in creating learning spaces in Victoria December 10th, 2009

Dr Elizabeth Hartnell-Young and Ms Lynne Sutton
Leading Practice in creating learning spaces in Victoria

May 13th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, 5pm (Video presentation)

In 2009 the Australian Government’s stimulus package in response to the Global Financial Crisis includes ‘Building the Education Revolution’. This involves building new science or language learning centres in disadvantaged secondary schools across Australia. Eligible schools need to have a demonstrated need, readiness and capacity to complete the facilities before 30 June 2010. Victoria has produced a range of interesting designs based on the evidence from its Leading School Fund work, where, over recent years, whole-school change has been supported by development and renewal of facilities. Lynne and Elizabeth will show the designs, discuss how they have been informed by recent evidence and current needs, and identify challenges for designers and educators.

Dr Elizabeth Hartnell-Young is Group Manager Research in the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Victoria, Australia and also an honorary fellow at The University of Melbourne. Ms Lynne Sutton is Senior Project Manager, Building the Education Revolution project at the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Victoria.

Researching the relationship between sustainable design in education buildings and institutional change for sustainability. December 10th, 2009

Glenn Strachan
Researching the relationship between sustainable design in education buildings and institutional change for sustainability.

May 11th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

Increasing numbers of education buildings are labelled as being sustainable and deliver environmental management benefits. However, consideration is not always given to how elements of sustainable design can be used as a catalyst for whole institutional change. This seminar will explore a research method for investigating the relationship between sustainable building design and institutional change for sustainability in the education sector.
Glenn taught in schools and colleges until 1998 when he left the formal education sector to become Head of Education at Earth Centre, a flagship Millennium Project in Yorkshire based on demonstrating and promoting sustainable development. From 2002 to 2008 he combined consultancy work on a wide range of sustainable development projects with work on the London South Bank University, Education for Sustainability Master’s Programme. He joined the International Research Institute in Sustainability at the University of Gloucestershire in June 2008 where he leads a research strand on professional practice and sustainability. He is also pursuing his own research interests in the sustainable design of education buildings with a view to completing a PhD.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/96e63bf3-68bb-40f7-b60a-997ba80589d9/media.m4v

Learning through Architecture – Engagement, design and construction as a learning tool December 10th, 2009

Prue Chiles
Learning through Architecture – Engagement, design and construction as a learning tool

May 6th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

The talk will look at how schools and playgrounds can inspire children and staff about issues of environment, about healthy living, about interactive learning. and about how the process of design and construction is fundamental to creating a good learning environment. This will be illustrated by our own built projects and others we have found inspiring and supported by our research.

Prue Chiles is Director of Architecture at the School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield and continues to practice as architect and Director of the Bureau of Design and Research, Sheffield.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/244026ad-f36b-4dfe-86fa-d046116b98b4/media.m4v

Listening to Children: developing the sustainable school December 10th, 2009

Elizabeth Barratt Hacking
Listening to Children: developing the sustainable school

April 29th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, ***2.00pm

A range of resources, advice and tools have been provided to support schools in planning their ‘journey to sustainability’ in consideration of the campus, curriculum and community dimensions of the sustainable schools initiative. However, this advice tends to focus on the role of adults involved in leading this initiative, with little attention paid to the potential role of children. Drawing on participatory research with children and adults in schools I will explore the benefits of listening to children and engaging children’s participation in developing the sustainable school.

Elisabeth is an academic from the Centre for Research in Education and the Environment, University of Bath, UK. Elisabeth lectures in geographical and environmental education and learning at postgraduate level. Her research focuses on how environmental experience influences children’s wellbeing; this is undertaken in school settings using participatory research approaches with children and teachers. She was co-director of the ESRC (UK Research Council) project ‘Listening to Children: Environmental Perspectives and the School Curriculum’ and is currently co-ordinating a research project for the national ‘Growing Schools’ programme in England. Recently, Elisabeth co-edited ‘Childhood and Environment’, a special issue of the journal Environmental Education Research. Elisabeth was Honorary Editor of the journal Teaching Geography for almost 10 years.

Basics of Good School Design December 10th, 2009

Alan Dale
Basics of Good School Design

April 27th, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5 pm

Alan Dale is an experience schools architects working both for local authority and in private practice. He has recently been working as a design advisor for Building Schools for the Future programmes in the North West, South London and Islington and is preparing a book on school design which summarizes his many years of experience.

Please see the links below to the video recording of the lecture:

http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/c6bf64b7-55bc-4085-9261-18c931b1de99/media.m4v

At the heart of the (sustainable) community… December 10th, 2009

Robin Nicholson
CBE RIBA Hon FIStructE

At the heart of the (sustainable) community…
April 22nd, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5 pm

My journey will bring together some thoughts arising from the education work of our practice, the urban regeneration business under New Labour, CABE’s work on school design and sustainable development and the work of the Zero Carbon Schools Task Force. I will explore some of the gaps between what is and what must be if we are to have a chance of mitigating the effects of climate change and our need for design excellence.

Robin Nicholson is a senior member of Edward Cullinan Architects, which he joined in 1979. Previously he had worked for James Stirling and taught at the Bartlett and North London. He was a Vice-President of the RIBA (1992-94), Chairman of the Construction Industry Council (1998-2000) and founder member of the Movement for Innovation Board (1998-2001). He sat on the DETR Urban Sounding Board (2001-03). Currently he is Joint Deputy Chair of CABE, where he leads on Climate Change and Sustainable Development. He is a Board Member of the NHBC and chairs NHBC Services Ltd. He is chairman of the DCSF Zero Carbon Task Force. He helped develop the Design Quality Indicator and sits on the DQI Development Group. He is Convenor of the Construction Industry think-tank, The Edge Debates (1996-), and was awarded a CBE for Services to Architecture in 1999 and an Honorary Fellowship of the Institution of Structural Engineers in 2002.

Please see the links below to the audio recording of the lecture (University login required):

Mp3 version:
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/65b53d42-7f33-420f-8095-9b2b55391581/media.mp3

m4b (audio book)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/65b53d42-7f33-420f-8095-9b2b55391581/media.m4b

m4v (enhanced podcast)
http://uilapech01.nottingham.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/65b53d42-7f33-420f-8095-9b2b55391581/media.m4v

Education Design and Crowd Control December 10th, 2009

Mark Dudek
Education Design and Crowd Control

20th April, C15, Pope Building, University Park Campus, The University of Nottingham, 5pm

From Tom Brown’s School Days, by way of Lindsay Anderson’s If, through to The Wire and Laurent Cantet’s The Class, school environments are and always have been the context for high drama. As designers, should we therefore be more interested in the people using the spaces rather than making grand architectural statements about how buildings can transform people’s lives? By way of an introduction to the series, Mark Dudek asks the question, why are the environments within which education and learning takes place, of such high cultural value, yet at the same time perceived to be so little significance by the teaching profession?

Mark Dudek is an architect and school design consultant, Director of Mark Dudek Associates a specialist architectural design consultancy concentrating on education and childcare. He is author of many authoritative books on school design, including Schools and Kindergartens: A Design Manual, Building for Young Children, Children’s Spaces, Architecture of Schools: The New Learning Environments and Kindergarten Architecture.

What is DesignShare? DesignShare is the central address for the very best in educational facilities and their impact on the learning process. DesignShare provides an invaluable service as a facilitator of ideas and resources about best practices and innovation in schools from early childhood through the university level. Who is DesignShare’s audience? DesignShare reaches a truly global community of professionals. More than 150,000 architects, planners, educators, and facility decision makers visit the site each month. Architects who specify products for schools and universities make up over half of DesignShare’s total readership. Who are our sponsors?
Fielding Nair International: Architects and Change Agents for Creative Learning Communities
VS America, Inc.: Ergonomic educational and office furniture.

Become a SPONSOR by Joining the "Partners in Education" Program.

Recent Articles Kids LOVE Their New School! Liberated Spaces: Purposeful School Design Says Goodbye to Cells and Bells Leaner, More Effective Schools Douglas Park School Opens in Regina Exploring Six Principles of Sustainable School Design A Variety of Voices: Innovative Learning Spaces Transform the Hartland-Lakeside School District Transforming Schools for the 21st Century The Classroom Is Obsolete: It’s Time for Something New Suggested Links ArchNewsNow.com EdVisions Schools Schools for Life
Edutopia
School Construction News
Education News A Tribute to Dr. Jeff Lackney
(Please note that DesignShare does not own the rights to most of the images on our web site. If you want to use an image in your own work, you must contact the architectural design firm directly in order to get permission.)
Meta
Membership | Reprint Policies | About | Contact | Home
© DesignShare.com 1998-2014. All rights reserved.